Extreme Summer Weather

HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls and other community facilities.
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat and take frequent breaks.

SIGNS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION; IF SOMEONE HAS SYMPTOMS:

  • Heavy sweating but skin may be cool, pale or flushed.
  • Weak pulse.
  • Normal body temperature is possible, but temperature will likely rise.
  • Fainting or dizziness, nausea, vomiting, exhaustion and headaches are possible.

IF SOMEONE HAS SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION:

  • Move the victim to a cool area.
  • Increase cool water intake.
  • Place cool, wet towel on neck and under arms.
  • Seek medical attention if symptoms worsen.

SIGNS OF HEAT STROKE; CALL 9-1-1 IF SOMEONE HAS THESE SYMPTOMS:

  • High body temperature (105+).
  • Hot, red, dry skin.
  • Rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing.
  • Victim will probably not sweat unless victim was sweating from recent strenuous activity.
  • Possible unconsciousness